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DAY 1

BLOCK 1: 14:30 - 16:00

Digital Transport and Logistics Forum (DTLF)

The DTLF is an expert group set up by the European Commission to provide a platform for structural dialogue, exchange and provision of technical expertise, as well as cooperation and coordination between the Commission, Member States and supply chain stakeholders. The group assists the Commission in the development and implementation of the activities and programmes aimed at the digitalisation of transport and logistics.

Under its first mandate (2015-2018), two subgroups were established. Subgroup 1 (SG1) dealt with the digitalisation, acceptance and harmonisation of electronic freight transport information and supported the Commission in the preparation of the proposal for a Regulation on electronic freight transport information (eFTI). Subgroup 2 (SG2) aimed to facilitate data sharing and to establish enhanced interoperability between various information systems and data platforms in supply and logistics chains through defining the parameters for a federated network of platforms.

In 2018, the Commission set up the second mandate of the Forum. SG1 will support the Commission in the implementation of the eFTI Regulation, once adopted. In particular SG1 will provide expertise as regards the definition of common eFTI data set and subsets; common procedures, detailed rules and specifications for the access to eFTI platforms; as well as the requirements for eFTI platforms and service providers. SG2 will substantiate the concept of a federated network of platforms in particular through defining the access rules and technical protocols for platform interoperability, developing specifications for technology independent services that support organisations in sharing data without prior agreements, and through determining the governance structure.

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Towards dynamic multimodal travel information services

Digital data is an essential resource for economic growth, competitiveness, innovation, job creation and societal progress in general. The value of the EU data economy was more than €285 billion in 2015. If favourable policy and legislative conditions are put in place in time and investments in ICT are encouraged, the value of the European data economy may increase to €739 billion by 2020, representing 4% of the overall EU GDP. On the other hand, the availability, accessibility of data, and the sharing of data between transport stakeholders is a pre-requisite for improving passenger experience across modes, for integrated planning, ticketing and payment services.

Ideally, data must be provided in a digital format and in such a way that it can be automatically shared to and processed by other parties. Regardless of the mode of transport, a provider of passenger mobility services shall ensure that essential, up-to-date data on its services is available from an open interface in a standard, easy to edit, and computer-readable format. Such essential data includes inter alia information on routes, stops, timetables, prices, availability and accessibility. The Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2017/1926 of 31 May 2017 provides the establishment of National Access Points by Member States where such data can be retrieved and re-used under certain conditions.

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Through-ticketing for cross-border rail journeys

Today, rail passengers travelling through Europe, can buy a single train ticket only in few cases. Most of the time, when travelling between Member States or when changing train operator, they have to buy multiple tickets, using multiple on- or off-line sales points. Having multiple tickets instead of a single one, also affects cover by passenger rights.

Against the backdrop of rising climate change concerns in society, the Paris agreement climate goals and renewed interest in international train travel, any initiative to make rail travel more accessible and more convenient is welcome. Comfort and convenience for the passenger is primordial.

In this session, giving the word to relevant players in the field, the Commission will assess the current state of play of smart rail ticketing, as well as developments, trends and possible improvements. Further, in discussion with the panellists, the Commission will assess what initiatives at European level would support the development of through-ticketing for rail.

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BLOCK 2: 16:30 - 18:00

How to enable Mobility as a Service (MaaS)

This session will explore the approach taken by different countries to enable Mobility as a Service and will discuss what should be done at EU level.

It seems that a growing number of countries are interested in promoting ticket integration and MaaS and there are some specific projects underway. For example, Finland has now a law integrating all modes of transport and enabling new, user-oriented transport services. MaaS is the central theme of the Finnish Act on Transport Services. France has worked on its “mobility law” which includes provision on multimodal digital sales/reservation services. The Netherlands has launched several MaaS pilots and is working with neighbouring regions to define a common approach. Austria has a nation-wide MaaS project.

The Commission has ordered a study on remaining challenges to ticketing and payment system. The study has provided recommendations for ways forward that will be discussed during the session.

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Digital and Automated Railways

Automation, AI, Space Technology enabled by Galileo, mobile communication based on 5G are changing dramatically the landscape for Rail Operations.

On Automation, trials in operational conditions are on-going for Grade of Automation 1 / 2, delivering capacity and energy savings, while the environmental conditions are explored for fully automated railways.

Exploiting ERTMS potential calls for Level 3 deployment, to which innovative sensors abed (also) on space technology (Galileo) contribute with the following functionalities

  • ofail-safe positioning;
  • oon-board train integrity;

Furthermore, new radio systems based on 5G technology will allow railways to make a leapfrog evolution both on critical application and connectivity, overcoming voice-data split, offering new perspectives through network slicing and cybersecurity features.

The vast amount of data gathered – and shared – by digital applications provide the opportunity to enhance the quality of rail services: the case presented focuses on real-time data exchange within railways and terminals (Expected Time of Arrival) and the potential of Artificial Intelligence to enhance data quality.

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Day 2

Block 3: 09:00 - 10:30

Towards the multimodal and integrated Single Window environment

The movement of goods and means of transport must comply with EU and national legislation and international agreements. This creates numerous and burdensome reporting obligations for the trade and transport community. Today, the lack of coordination and harmonisation for this reporting generates costly processes and redundant procedures such as multiple submissions of information or duplicate information requests from authorities.

Digitalisation offers a large potential to improve the efficiency, reliability and cost-effectiveness of cross-border operations for both businesses and administrations – the European Maritime Single Window environment and EU Custom’s systems are examples of latest such developments. Should the EU aim to provide even more harmonised and interoperable single window services for the traders and transport operators?

The session should give an overview on the state of play of the work in this respect and verify the intermediate results of the preparatory work.

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Establishing a European partnership on connected and automated mobility on roads

The development and establishment of an innovative connected and automated road transport system poses a multitude of challenges. Especially as Research & Development topics still need to be identified, induced, conducted and coordinated for the different automation levels on a European scale. The coordinated support of the EU especially for higher levels of automation can play an important role here.

The European Single Platform for Open road testing of CCAM is currently prioritising these needs and an Impact Assessment is analysing in which way a European Partnership could support these efforts. The European Partnership should tackle technical challenges for the overall system (the vehicle and infrastructure), and stimulate their harmonisation and standardisation in order to assure a seamless European CCAM transport system.

The session should give an overview on the state of play of the work in this respect and verify the intermediate results of the preparatory work.

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Building a data layer: Network of national (data) access points - NAP

Moving towards a Single European Transport Area requires a data layer interlinking all of the elements of transport and allowing the development of ITS services.

In line with the ITS Directive requirements, the Member States are setting up their National Access Points (NAPs) to facilitate access, ease the exchange and re-use of transport related data, in order to support the development of EU-wide interoperable travel and traffic information services and their provision to end users.

Building up this data layer involves open and common standards and interfaces as well as an efficient, but secure data ecosystem.

It also requires an unprecedented level of cooperation and harmonisation efforts across local, regional and national administrations, to ensure a level playing field with clear roles and responsibilities for public and private transport, mobility and service providers, or operators.

This session is dedicated to better understand how the European network of NAPs can be the backbone of an Harmonised European ITS Data Infrastructure that is required for the provision of such services.

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Mobility as a Service (MaaS) Summit

Moving towards a Single European Transport Area requires a data layer interlinking all of the elements of transport and allowing the development of ITS services.

In line with the ITS Directive requirements, the Member States are setting up their National Access Points (NAPs) to facilitate access, ease the exchange and re-use of transport related data, in order to support the development of EU-wide interoperable travel and traffic information services and their provision to end users.

Building up this data layer involves open and common standards and interfaces as well as an efficient, but secure data ecosystem.

It also requires an unprecedented level of cooperation and harmonisation efforts across local, regional and national administrations, to ensure a level playing field with clear roles and responsibilities for public and private transport, mobility and service providers, or operators.

This session is dedicated to better understand how the European network of NAPs can be the backbone of a Harmonised European ITS Data Infrastructure that is required for the provision of such services.

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Block 4: 11:00 - 12:30

Electronic Freight Transport information

The European Commission put forward in May 2018 the proposal for an EU Regulation on Electronic Freight Transport Information (eFTI), providing horizontal EU rules that will establish a uniform, predictable and trusted environment for the electronic exchange of information on goods transported within the EU. Transport operators of all modes will have the possibility to use electronic documentation, with the guarantee that all EU MS authorities concerned will accept it, provided certain harmonised requirements are met. Business-to-business electronic exchanges along the entire logistics chain will also be significantly boosted. Efficiency gains of up to EUR 20-27 billion by 2040 are expected, in all transport modes.

As the draft Regulation is still under consideration by the EU co-legislators, and the implementation specifications are yet to be defined, this session aims to gather views and recommendations from the wider stakeholder community. What would be the most significant impacts and how is the Regulation expected to generate them? What are the factors that may affect adoption by operators? What could be the main challenges for implementation? And how could these be tackled to fully reap the expected benefits?...

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Automation: legislative implications for professional road transport?

The road transport sector is the backbone of the EU economy. It carries 75% of road freight and 90% of all passengers within the EU.

Technological developments, in particular, are transforming road transport, by introducing new systems such as driver assistance in the vehicles, connected vehicles, platooning, satellite geo-localisation and remote digital communication devices.

It is expected that moving to a higher degree of automation of vehicles can produce significant safety, environmental and economic benefits. Automation has the potential to eliminate driver errors, and to achieve environmental and economic benefits through more fuel-efficient driving and less congestion.

In order to reap these benefits and produce a positive business case for users, while preserving the objectives of a well-functioning internal market, social rights and road safety, efficiency and sustainability of transport, this session will discuss any modifications needed in the areas of social and market legislation, in relation to current enforcement rules and practices and with respect to liabilities.

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Blockchain for transport and mobility

Blockchain and other distributed ledger technologies are often portrayed as enablers of a more efficient, dynamic and seamless use of the transport system. They have great potential to improve transparency and traceability throughout the supply chain, raise the level of participant trust in a given network, facilitate regulatory compliance, reduce transport’s transaction costs, strengthen security of data and function as a tool to combat corruption. However, applications in the transport sector are still few compared to many use cases of other digital technologies, such as the use of sensors and automation. Is blockchain the right tool for everyone? What are the obstacles to full exploitation of its benefits in the transport and logistic sector?

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14:00 - 15:30

Plenary 1 Data sharing for transport and mobility

A modernised transport system will be Europe’s next success story. With data, transport can take a customer-oriented approach breaking down silos between different transport modes and creating new business opportunities for European companies. However, data policy in the transport sector is not only about promoting mobility services. In the future, data will link together mobility services, logistics, autonomous transport, transport infrastructure, and traffic and fleet management in all transport modes into one holistic system.

It is this development that promotes transport efficiency, safety, accessibility and environmental and climate goals, which are the underlying societal objectives of any transport policy. However, to reach those goals, we need first get data moving.

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Block 5: 16:00 - 17:30

Freight Corridor Information Systems for seamless data sharing in the supply chain

Digitalisation, new technologies and big data have the potential to change the way cargo and traffic flows are organised and managed, they generate business opportunities and pave the way for innovation, new services and business models. Data are available at an unprecedented scale, and the challenge is to combine and re-use them across various sectors and modes in order to generate added-value services. Today however, very often supply chain actors operate in disconnected information silos. Although existing interoperability initiatives offer some improvement, stakeholders are only partially able to share data. This missed digitalisation potential equates to unnecessary administrative burden, costs and inefficiencies in the entire transport and logistics chains.

The Digital Transport and Logistics Forum (DTLF), an expert group set up by the European Commission, addresses these issues and aims to provide answers. In principle, the DTLF has developed a generic concept for a federated network of platforms to facilitate data sharing between all stakeholders in supply chains. This solution will establish interoperability between platforms, thus enabling an individual user to easy plug in and play in a trusted, safe and secure environment, offering the provision and access to various technology-independent logistics services. The DTLF will further substantiate and validate this concept through defining the access rules and technical protocols for platform interoperability, developing specifications for technology independent services and determining governance structures. It will also provide recommendations to the Commission for possible measures to facilitate the implementation of the federated network of platforms at large scale.

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New mobility and freight transport services in smart cities (incl. urban air mobility - drones)

Today's cities face challenges in terms of congestion, lack of space, growing population, air quality, noise, liveability, social inclusion, health, economic development and creation of jobs. Citizens want to be mobile and move from a to b - within and between cities - easily, cheap, smart and clean. Freight needs to be transported equally easy, cheap, smart and clean. Expanding infrastructure in the urban environment is almost never an option and not a sustainable long-term solution: It is not cost-effective, there is no space, it gives environmental issues and citizens want custom-made and flexible solutions instead of strictly regulated public transport. This session will provide on the one side information about new digitally-enabled services, and on the other side will discuss the need for regulation for their integration in a multimodal urban transport system.

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Future delivery models for Air Traffic Management data and market opportunities?

In 2019, the Airspace Architecture Study produced by the SESAR Joint Undertaking recommended the creation of a new virtualized and common air traffic management (ATM) data service layer, with a new ecosystem enabling ATM data to be shared between European Air Traffic Service Providers (ATSPs) in a secure and expeditious way. This ecosystem may also drive the development of a new European market for ATM data services. Currently, air traffic services are almost everywhere provided by vertically integrated national ATSPs. Those national ATSPs are each responsible for producing, processing and combining this data to make it available to their frontline operators, who will use it to provide air traffic services for airspace users. Most of this data is currently not fully shared between ATSPs. Achieving a resilient European ATM system requires an evolution of the existing model so that the necessary ATM data (such as communication, navigation, satellite, meteorological and aeronautical information data) can be shared and made available throughout Europe. In the future, ATSPs may even choose to shift to a new service delivery model in which they focus on their core capability of air traffic services delivery and therefore acquire their data services from one or more separate ATM data service providers.

The onset of a new European market for ATM data services would need to be underpinned by technical solutions, legal requirements and service delivery structures in order to function effectively. The aim of this panel will be to discuss the potential future delivery models for ATM data service provision, including the associated market opportunities and challenges.

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Day 3

Block 6: 09:00 - 10:30

Towards Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS) – Technological and Regulatory Aspects

The scope of this session concern the technological and regulatory developments and needs towards the deployment of Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships. Ship-centric view, communications between ships and between ship and shore will be taken into consideration– eg. Vessel Traffic Monitoring/Services, management and control - point of view. By means of digitalisation and automation it is expected to improve efficiency, safety and at the same time reducing the environmental impact. The technology progresses gradually from partial system to system level and towards full-scale trials. The ship navigates in different degrees of autonomy depending on operational environment and the goal is not necessarily a completely unmanned ships. Some key issues such as availability, quality and interoperability of dynamic and static data and communications infrastructure (eg. 5G as a general-purpose technology). Consideration will also be given to the transparency of algorithms which is key element for the administrations to influence the criteria on which the decision-making of automated ships is based and for the wider public to generate trust around this new technology. It is essential to advance in Europe ecosystems that enable trust between stakeholders, building common rules and intermediary data exchange platforms and trials.

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Digitalization of TEN-T: from research to deployment

Digitalisation, new technologies and big data will change the way traffic flows are organised and managed, they generate business opportunities and pave the way for innovation, new services and business models. They enable cooperation between supply chain actors, real-time management of traffic flows, simplification as well as the reduction of administrative burden and allow for a better use of infrastructures and resources, thereby increase efficiency and lower costs for freight and passengers.

H2020 is supporting Actions, which develop solutions for the optimisation of the transport networks. CEF provides the opportunity for research results to be tested and implemented at large scale level.

DG MOVE and INEA are promoting the synergies between research and deployment programmes. In an increasing number of cases, there is continuity from research to deployment on the TEN-T network.

During this session, we will hear about concrete examples and discuss how to facilitate that H2020 results can be used to the benefit of the TEN-T network.

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Artificial Intelligence, Internet of Things, algorithms, big data: what for transport and mobility

Emerging digital technologies, such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT) and big data, create new opportunities and benefits for our society. The mobility sector can profoundly be transformed through new data-driven services and new business. IoT enables real time communication through the Internet, among devices, vehicles and infrastructures. The potential of data analytics is amplified by advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI). The increased automation in transport will enable, prevention of human errors and potentially improved safety. Promoting IoT, AI and automation is one of the central means of improving the competitiveness of the European transport industry to stay competitive. Automation also helps especially to improve the safety and efficiency of transport and fulfilment of environmental and climate goals in all modes of transport.

The trust of consumers in technologies, devices and applications related to the safe and secure processing of data must be strengthened. Authorities also need a full understanding as they want to influence the criteria on which the decision-making of autonomous vehicles is based, as well as increase trust among the users.

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5G for connected and automated mobility

5G is expected to be a major enabler of connected and automated mobility (CAM) in Europe. Thanks to its ultra-reliability and low-latency features enabling a mission critical exchange of data between sensor-equipped vehicles, transport path infrastructure, mobile users, telecom networks and cloud, 5G will enable ground vehicles to become effectively autonomous. It will contribute to enhance road safety, reduce Co2 emissions and traffic congestion, and offer great opportunities for growth and jobs in Europe. 5G will undoubtedly have an impact on the travel industry at both a consumer-facing and operational level.

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Block 7: 11:00 - 12:30

Towards optimising port ecosystems

Ports are key nodes in the logistics chain where maritime, inland waterway and land transport meet. Port operations may constitute a discontinuity in digitalisation or serve as an engine for digital advancement. There is no doubt that we need to embrace digitalisation. It is an increasingly important driver for efficiency, simplification and lowering costs:

  • It increases the efficiency of our transport systems and logistics chains as well as the utilisation of existing resources and infrastructures.
  • It optimises supply chain visibility and resilience, improves safety and security, and enhances environmental performance of transport and logistic operations.
  • It contributes to cutting administrative burden.
  • It allows for a much better integration of all types of transport, so that users can easily mix and match transport modes according to their needs, leading to genuine multi-modality.

Ports could support the entire logistics chain by opening, in compatible machine-readable format, essential freight transport data like arrival and departure time. This would allow for the right timing of services at the port and to/from the hinterland and would contribute to the development of multimodal transport chains and functioning port and maritime ecosystems that are needed.

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Digitalisation and decarbonisation – two sides of the same coin

Digitalisation offers new and unprecedented opportunities for further decarbonisation of the transport sector. Big data, Artificial Intelligence or Blockchain – new technologies will significantly change the way cargo and traffic flows are organised and managed in the years to come. Bringing the transport system to a completely new level of efficiency - including better integration of modes of transport and multimodality - can lead to a significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, while bringing about other major co-benefits.

Making full use of those benefits requires considerable effort: increased investment to support research and innovation for further technological breakthrough, the large-scale roll out of already existing solutions but also building up expertise and reskilling of the work force. Digitalisation is a means to an end - it is important to ensure that emission reductions are sustained. It requires the EU to further work on the enabling policy framework. This requires also a debate about an active role in global standardisation and the need of harmonisation at EU level.

This session will bring together transport practitioners to discuss digitalisation and its benefits for decarbonisation across transport modes – road, rail, maritime and aviation. It should discuss the lessons modes can learn from each other and the overall implications for policy-making at EU level.

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What can 5G bring to each modes of transport?

5G is expected to be a major enabler of connected and automated mobility (CAM) in Europe. Thanks to its ultra-reliability and low-latency features enabling a mission critical exchange of data between sensor-equipped vehicles, transport path infrastructure, mobile users, telecom networks and cloud, 5G will enable unmanned air, sea, subsurface and ground vehicles to become effectively autonomous. It will contribute to enhance road safety, reduce Co2 emissions and traffic congestion, and offer great opportunities for growth and jobs in Europe. 5G will undoubtedly have an impact on the travel industry at both a consumer-facing and operational level.

Part A. 3 Presentations of H2020 projects for trials (total 30 min):

  • 5G for automotive: H2020 projects, 5GCARMEN, 5GCROCO, 5GMobix
  • 5G for rail: H2020 project 5G-PICTURE
  • 5G for drones: H2020 project 5G!Drones

Part B. Round table with representatives of the transport community and of the telecom community in order to discuss potential use cases (40 min). The floor is first given to transport representatives who express their needs and then to telecom representatives for replying on whether they can meet the demand.

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Managing the transition towards digitalisation and automation – social aspects

Jobs in the transport sector are at high risk of automation. At the same time, the ongoing transformation presents new opportunities. The social dimension of the transition to automation was already addressed at the 2017 Digital Transport Days. Following up, the Council called on the Commission to assess the socio-economic and environmental impact of automation and digitalisation in the field of transport taking into account the new skills needed in that sector, and, if necessary, to propose measures to address those impacts (5 December 2017). In November 2018, the Commission organised a conference on the impact on the labour force, which confirmed that stakeholders expect public authorities at all levels to take action to accompany the transition. On 7 June 2019, the Council reiterated that addressing opportunities and challenges related to digitalisation is a most urgent task for Europe.

The session will look at common challenges across transport modes and professions - including gender aspects - and how we can manage the transition towards digitalisation and automation for the labour force in transport.

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BLOCK 8: 13:30 - 15:00

Towards Digital Inland Waterways

DG MOVE published a study Digital Inland Navigation (DINA) in 2017 and a related Staff Working Document in 2018. These documents called for further developments in digitalisation to ensure that inland waterways transport stays competitive by meeting the needs of administrations, businesses and stakeholders by interconnecting information on infrastructure, people, operations, fleet and cargo in the IWT sector and to connect this information with other transport modes.

In this interactive session some new and innovative projects, initiatives, demos will be presented, followed by a discussion about possible actions to feed the further digitalisation of Inland waterways transport on European level.

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Funding and financing transport digitalisation

Following illustrations of opportunities 5G is offering for different modes of transport in the previous session, this Part C of the following session will present the public funding opportunities proposed under CEF Digital as part of the next EU long term budget.

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Cybersecurity for Transport and mobility

As digitalisation profoundly transforms the transport sector, the issue of cybersecurity is gaining in prevalence and the number of cyber-attacks has steadily increased over the past years. At EU level, cybersecurity is primarily addressed by a horizontal framework composed of the Directive on Security of Network and Information Systems (NIS Directive) and the Cybersecurity Act.

While this framework constitutes a good baseline to enhance cybersecurity and cyber-resilience in the transport sector, additional sector-specific measures may be required. Any such measures should reflect the needs and specificities of each transport mode.

Against this background, the objective of this session will be to take stock of how the transport sector is tackling cybersecurity in a complex environment, including regulatory and non-regulatory measures and in the wider context of hybrid threat. The panel will discuss the remaining challenges and how to address them.

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NRAs and digital (road) infrastructure for future mobility

National road authorities have a long history and tradition, initially as providers of basic road pavements they nevertheless focused on customer service. Already in 700BC, it was said “Go through the gates, Clear the way for the people; Build up the highway, Clear the stones, lift up a sign for the peoples” (Isaiah 62:10) which address the elements of construction, maintenance and information. Much later, the term ‘civil engineer’ was born in the road sector and reinforced the societal focus of the role, but modern road authorities are developing new skills and tools to become more ‘engineers’ of mobility and guardians of societal goals.

This session will address the opportunities and challenges of digitalisation and the consequences for the roles of (digital and physical) infrastructure managers. This session brings together different actors from the land transport – road and multimodal, private and public, and physical and digital to consider the different issues that are being addressed and what will need to be addressed in the future.

The essential challenge is how to develop a harmonized Europe-wide digital infrastructure that helps (road) authorities harvest the potential benefits. Digitalisation will influence all aspects of transport. This includes the aspects of traffic operations such as connected vehicles, integrated network management (including intermodality) as well as the planning and management of infrastructure with tools such as Building Information Modelling (BIM) and the Internet of Things. Perhaps more importantly it will influence the relation between transport providers and users as social media and the transparency of data are increasingly involved in both long-term planning and day-to-day management. The role of digitisation in the financing of our transport systems is another area of great interest. All of this aims to address the urgent challenges and opportunities related to environment, transport efficiency and road safety and making the best use of existing (physical) infrastructures.

Moderator:

  • Steve Phillips, Conference of European Directors of Roads

Speakers:

  • Elizabeth Werner, Director Land Transport, DG MOVE
  • Lena Erixon, Director-General Trafikverket, Sweden
  • Sabine Kuehschelm, Director of roads, BMViT, Austria
  • Malika Seddi, Director International Affairs, ASFA, France
  • Serge van Damme, Top Adviser, Rijkswaterstaat, Netherlands
  • Serge van Damme, Top Adviser, Rijkswaterstaat, Netherlands
  • Fuensanta Martinez Sans, Policy Director, ACEA, ES

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Closing session: 15:30 - 16:30

What digital initiatives to support a sustainable planet-friendly TEN-T network?

With regard to transport, the CEF is helping to complete the Trans-European Transport Networks (TEN-T) core network by 2030 and a comprehensive network by 2050. TEN-T facilitates cross-border connections, strengthens financial, social and regional cohesion and helps to create a more competitive social market economy and to mitigate climate change. TEN-T revision 2023 should reflect developments in the years after 2027 to meet the challenges of climate change as well as the opportunities provided by new transport routes in the North. On the other hand, developments on digitalisation are progressing at a quick pace (with big data, artificial intelligence, automation, the Internet of Things etc.). They entail vast changes in the transport and mobility system overall and challenge the TEN-T as an enabler of future-oriented mobility solutions.

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